Top Readers’ Choices for 8-12 year olds

Lora-Mauricio - 0018Thanks to a follower’s suggestion we’ve put together a list of recommended reading for 8-12 year-olds.  (Thank you Sabina).

 

 


Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald DahlCharlie and the Chocolate Factory
By Roald Dahl

Against all the odds, poor Charlie Bucket finds a golden ticket to a trip of a lifetime to visit Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. The tour round the factory is every child’s dream, but too much of a temptation for Charlie’s fellow golden ticket winners. A classic, magical, rags-to-riches moral fairy tale. Ages 8+


How to train your dragon by Cressida CowellHow to Train Your Dragon
By Cressida Cowell

A laugh-out loud romp of a Viking adventure set on the windy Isle of Berk, this is the first in a hugely successful 10-book series and is now being made into a film. Having just passed his dragon initiation program, Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III, a young Viking searching for a way of becoming a hero, sets about the challenge. First, he must catch a dragon; then he will have to train it. Hiccup’s attempts are hilarious and charming, and the cold, soggy world of the Vikings provides an endless source of mirth. Ages 8+


Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Book 1 by Jeff Kinney

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Book 1 
By Jeff Kinney

Now a bestselling phenomenon, Greg Heffley’s diary captures the minutiae of his days as he starts middle school. In words and witty illustrations, Greg plots how to improve his life, avoid previous pitfalls – and how to increase his popularity with girls. Easy to read, touching and very entertaining. Ages 8+


Charlotte’s Web by EB White

Charlotte’s Web 
By EB White

How do words of praise such as “terrific” keep appearing mysteriously in the spider’s web above the pig pen in Farmer Zuckerman’s barn? These are the life-saving words that Charlotte the spider spins to save her friend Wilbur the piglet, the runt of a litter that is being reared for one purpose only. Watched over by Fern, a little girl who has adopted the pig as a pet, the interactions of Wilbur, Charlotte, Templeton the rat and the other barn animals as they campaign to save the pig’s life is an exceptional story of tenderness and triumph. Ages 8+


One Dog and his Boy by Eva Ibbotson

One Dog and his Boy 
Eva Ibbotson

All Hal has ever wanted is a dog. His parents refuse to contemplate the idea; a dog would mess up their beautiful house and disturb their busy routine. When they discover Easy Pets, they hire Hal a dog for a weekend thinking that will do the trick. But Hal discovers Fleck has to be returned, so he runs away, and all the dogs from Easy Pets escape with him. Soon, there’s a price on his head. How Hal makes his escape and the story of his adventures as a fugitive is both thrilling and moving. Ages 9+


Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan

Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief 
Rick Riordan (Puffin)

Percy Jackson was once an ordinary schoolboy, but his life changes for ever when he discovers he is the son of the Greek god Poseidon. Skateboarding and basketball are soon swapped for sword fights and monster hunts and the daily struggle to stay alive. And when Zeus accuses Percy of stealing his lightning bolt, life gets very dangerous indeed. Terrific adventure that seamlessly joins two worlds. Ages 10+


Millions by Frank Cottrell Boyce

Millions * Words on a Limb Pick *Readers pick
Frank Cottrell Boyce

Boyce’s bittersweet novel is a delicious funny story with some serious things to say about what brings happiness. Damian and his brother Anthony find a bag full of money, but have only a few days before the currency becomes worthless. Initially excited at being able to have anything they want, the brothers quickly discover that they no longer know the value of anything. And anyway, money cannot bring back the one thing they want most – their mother. An entertaining, provocative and life-affirming adventure. Ages 10+


Advertisements

Please feel free to comment...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s