Everything is a Blur – Artists on a Limb

GravatarHello everyone, welcome back to Words on Art. 

We have chosen words to go along with Irene’s painting submission Venus. We had asked you to submit your words and captions and we’ve gone through the entries and have chosen a successful submission. Thank you to all who participated.  We would like to present Hernán’s words. Enjoy!

Thank you for your submission Hernán.


And just like that, you are gone
The emptiness is deafening
A harpoon has left a jagged hole in my chest
I am locked in a tomb.

Where has it gone wrong? What was said? Where did the end, begin?
It’s so quiet. I can’t see clearly, I can’t feel my arms, my legs, my soul.
I’m an emptied vessel, thrown out after use.
Everything is a blur.


For our next art piece, we are showcasing Jasmine’s sketch. Thank you for your submission! It is an untitled piece.

hugs


We are once again inviting readers to capture the essence of the art by submitting writing pieces (captions, poems, short narratives, etc).

To participate, please submit your words on art to wordsonalimb@bell.net. Please write Words on Art in the subject line.  If you have an art piece that you would like us to consider for our next showcase, please feel free to email us a picture.

Please note that the art pieces must be your own creation.

Looking forward to your next Words on Art.

Lora

Three Lessons My First Year in Teaching Taught Me

GravatarA young woman walks into a school, dressed in a tailored suit, just loose enough to mask her anxious composure. In one hand she holds a resume, in the other a leather portfolio.


“You can do this. You can do this,” she chants to herself, while quickening her steps, fighting an impulse to run back to her car. She heads straight to the office, looking for the principal. Minutes later, a tall bearded man steps out of the adjacent office and extends his arm.

“Hi, I’m Craig,” he begins and the young woman’s shoulders relax as she looks into his warm eyes. Phew, she can breathe again. “Yes, I received your resume this morning,” he explains. “We’ve actually just finished interviewing for all the positions we have available.” The young woman’s spirit sinks; but is reignited as he continues. “I have to say, though, I love your assertiveness and determination. How would you like to stay for an interview?” A smile breaks on the young woman’s face as the principal proceeds to call in other staff members to join in on the interview.

So began my journey as a primary grade school teacher. Continue reading

This is Not Goodbye!

f4939b9d9b4f5f90c8240245691056faGet out those lawn chairs, dust off the patio, find those sun hats you thought you’d never see.  Summer is finally here!  For us, teachers, this warm welcome is also accompanied by a departure, as we bid farewell to our cherished students.

In that honor, I would like to share a poem I wrote for my students marking this time of year.  If you read my last post, you know that for some students saying goodbye is not an easy task.  Well, this is not goodbye.

This is Not Goodbye!

TeacherFinalImage

As I send you on your way,
There’s something I want to say –

Throughout the year I watched you grow,
Blossom into the gem we all know.
We learned, we played, we laughed a lot,
We built a castle where once stood a dot.

As you spread your wings and begin to fly,
Always remember it began with a try.
‘I can’t’, ‘I won’t’, was not permitted,
Fear and doubt should be omitted.

Be your best and try your hardest,
Read a lot to go the farthest.
Come and visit and say ‘Hi’,
See you later – this is Not goodbye!

Feel free to download a copy of the poem by clicking on the link below.

This is Not Goodbye !
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Thank you and happy Summer everyone!

Creative Commons License
This is Not Goodbye by Lora Rozler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Silent Battle – Artists on a Limb

GravatarHello everyone, welcome back to Words on Art. 

Here is the last art piece we featured on Artists on a Limb. We had asked you to submit your words and captions to capture the essence of the art and were very pleased with the feedback we received.  Thank you to all who participated.  We would like to showcase the beautiful words sent to us by Aisha.

Thank you for your submission Aisha.


Silent Battle

I sit here in a crowded room,
And I am so alone.

I hear the voices of strangers,
Yet the silence is deafening.


For our next art piece, we are showcasing the work of Irene Berkovsky. Thank you Irene for your submission!

We are once again inviting readers to capture the essence of the art by submitting writing pieces (captions, poems, short narratives, etc).

To participate, please submit your words on art to wordsonalimb@bell.net. Please write Words on Art in the subject line.  If you have an art piece that you would like us to consider for our next showcase, please feel free to email us a picture.

Please note that the art pieces must be your own creation.

Looking forward to your next Words on Art.

Lora


Creative Commons License
Venus by Irene Berkovsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Words

Featured


Softcover Marketing           


In this emotional and highly visual picture book, a lonely letter sets off on a journey
to find meaning. As it encounters various letter combinations, it is confronted by
two distinct paths and must make an important choice.

Readers of all ages will be captivated by this simple, yet high concept, story that explores universal themes of discovery, relationships and the need to belong,
with an underlying message about bullying.

Both timeless and original, Words is an evocative tale about how letters become words and words create meaning – meaning which could ultimately
build or destroy.


 “WORDS” Picture Book
Available at all major online and in store
retailers including:
  barnes_noble_samsung   chapters


Creative Commons License
Words by Lora Rozler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Interview with Aubrey Davis

GravatarHello everyone. A couple of weeks ago I reached out to one of my favourite Canadian authors, the incomparable Aubrey Davis, who I met many years ago when he was kind enough to autograph a copy of Bagels From Benny for my kids. I asked if we could connect and learn about his journey as a writer. When we got news that he was available, we set up some time and had a chat with Mr. Davis. Here is his story. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed bringing it to you.


I’m Mauricio, managing editor at WOAL, and I had the unique privilege of spending some moments with one of Canada’s most cherished story-tellers and children’s authors. A world traveler, he has mastered the gift of recounting timeless traditional tales in both the oral and written disciplines for a modern day audience. We had a chance to reflect on writing, culture, books, movies, the state of the education but most indulging of all, to me, the distinct art of story-telling. He joined us via Skype from sunny downtown Toronto, on of all days, Mother’s Day.

Welcome Mr. Davis. We know early on you began your career as a story-teller, what inspired you to become a writer?

It began when I was a kid, I was 9 years old and I lived next door to a writer. I never spoke to him about his writing, nor did I see any of his writing, I just lived next door to him. One day I woke up and felt, I want to be a writer too. I kind of caught it like a cold. So I bugged my mom for a typewriter, and a great big Webster’s Dictionary and I started to write.

What I loved to write back then was funny things. I really loved humour. I was a fan of Mad Magazine and the Bible. I was a religious kid on my own, not through my parents. And I just kept writing funny things until grade 8.

Who were some of your champions supporting you early on? And what happened in Grade 8?

I think it was when I was a kid, my 6th grade teacher. I noticed all the other kids got their stories handed back to them and I was the only one that didn’t get a story back. I didn’t know what was going on. He read my story to the whole class, with tears of laughter running down his cheeks. And I thought “Oh, this is nice”. I loved to write in school.

I had a grade 8 teacher that wrote, “There’s nothing worse than humour poorly done”. That shut me down, and I didn’t write again until I was I was about 40 and I came into story-telling.

How did teaching shape your writing? Continue reading